Notices
 

Thread: Advice and help needed.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. Advice and help needed. 
    #1
    Active Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Calne
    Posts
    51
    So, where do i start... I've been riding a Honda CBF125 for coming up a year. In April i can go up to a 35kw bike as you full well know, that's a 600-650cc bike with throttle restriction. In this first year of me riding, i have came off 3 times...1) i didn't straighten myself properly after a roundabout because i was staring at other bikes 2) it was the first time it had rained in a while and i was on loose gravel at a T-junction in chippenham, i came off and ended up with binding breaks and last but not least 3) i was coming to a stop on mud, stupidly applied my front and rear break and more so dropped the bike (bending my front handle bars) than actually crashing it. SO! you're probably sat there like 'will she get to the point already!'. I have an SV650s waiting in my dads garage for my ass to be sat upon it for some time now. However my beloved step mum has said she's like to see me on my 125 for a year and not come off before i handle a larger engine. i spoke to my father tonight raising that in April i'll have to do my A2 license anyway as if i don't do it, i wont be able to go to any powered bike at the age of 21... id then have to wait till 24. My point being, if i pass my modular one and two on a larger engine, why cant i go on one from the point i pass...My step mum said i evidently made up my mind up regardless of my family's suggestion of me sticking to my 125 for another year, in which she continued with, i could do as i want as i evidently wasn't going to listen. However, i'm now left with mixed feelings as to whether i should go onto a larger bike; being more expensive yet fun and thrilling, meaning myself and my dad can finally go on tours together and ride round isle of man. however, making my family worry more and leaving myself questioning if its the right choice or not. Or i stick to my 125 for another year; prove i'm a safe rider, be sick to death of not having any power what so ever and fear i loose my passion for bikes because ill worry my thin tires will follow small ruts or dips in the road causing my back tire to loose traction. ultimately leaving me worried every time i go round roundabouts or sharp bends. My dad is a very experienced rider as he has been riding since before i was born and was a police motorcyclist.. He has shared his lessons and tricks with me. Hes even said that i'm a good rider but still have lots to learn.I'm now reaching out to all you experienced riders to see what you advise me to do and what you've experienced throughout your year or years of riding.
     
     

  2.  
    #2
    Administrator BB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    West Wilts
    Posts
    9,102
    Compromise, do your test but take more training, not just from your Dad but also from a professional trainer. Not dissing Dad in any way but 3rd party training will probably ease Step Mums mind as she may feel your Dad is too easy on you. Not saying he is, just maybe a perception.Always pay attention to what you are doing while on the bike, road surfaces, road users, weather etc etc. Concentrate, concentrate, concentrate until you could do it with your eyes shut - but please don't!! Don't diss the amount of fun to be had on smaller cc bikes. OK, can be boring on the bypass but so much fun down the back roads. I've toured out to the Czech republic on an old 350cc bike. Great fun. May be worth negotiating with step mum to have a 250/350 cc for a year or so, then you can take your licence but don't appear to be jumping on a huge (to her) machine. Sounds to me like she cares and worries about you so go easy on her. I've had everything from 100cc to 1000cc over the years. Recently got an SV myself and on 3rd outing, stalled, put the wrong boot down and toppled over on the junction nearest my house. Broke a lever not to mention huge dent in my ego and I've been riding for 35 years!! Doh. My partner and his triple fell over on the drive and broke a lever only the month before. We have all done it! So, I suggest taking your test when you can or want to. Don't worry about cc it's about skill and confidence. Don't move to something bigger than you are happy with until you are ready. Finally just relax and have fun that's what it's all aboutBB
    We could learn a lot from crayons; some are sharp, some are pretty, some are dull, while others bright, some have weird names, but they all have learned to live together in the same box.
     
     

  3.  
    #3
    Active Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Calne
    Posts
    51
    BB, Thanks for the reply! it will definitely be taken on board. The more advice i get, the better. I'm going to look at joining an advance motorbike group where they can also give me more support on the 125... which will help dramatically for the larger engine.
     
     

  4.  
    #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Upavon
    Posts
    548
    As a compromise could you not do your licence but rather than jump on the sv after passing stick to the 125 or as BB said get a 250 (lots of fun) for a while after passing? However that said personally I jumped on a cbr1000 an hour after I passed and thought that was easier to ride than my 125 as it was so stable, you also have more road presence on a larger bike which gives you confidence. I completely agree with BB with reference to getting training from a professional trainer, your dad is no doubt a great rider with a lot of sound advice but a lot of the training involves being shown how to pass the test not how to be a good rider. As for your step mum worrying I'm afraid to a certain extent that's something you are going to have to live with and ignore, if the families of any biker was 100% honest everyone of them would tell you they worry every time their loved ones get on their bike and do so until they get home, deep down bikers are selfish b@st@rds as their need to ride outweighs their families piece of mind,they may not know it but it's a fact (in my opinion). All 3 of your "offs" seem to have been at low speed with other things attracting your attention/not noticing road conditions which tells me you need to focus your attention when riding. Driving a car/van/lorry is easy and mostly can be done with 50% attention to your surroundings (although not advised) as people see you, however riding a bike demands 100% of your attention all the time as your invisible. When I ride I ride with the mindset that every other road-user is trying to murder my ass (even pheasants now ). You can not underestimate the importance of paying attention to the changing road surface/gravel/wet/dry/traffic/wildlife etc. Don't feel you have to rush things, statistically you have a lot of time left (Christ I sound like an old fart).
    Last edited by Badgerroy; 22-12-17 at 10:45 PM.
     
     

  5.  
    #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    bromham and melksham
    Posts
    580
    I get to ride and have ridden upto 1540cc's but the most fun had was on 250 mxers converted to supermoto. back in '75 I failed my test and passed car the following day, in '83 after getting married I retook the early CBT, probably a lot easier than nowadays. Ironically in the month of the test 3 close mates were killed on bikes. mother was always against bikes as her brother had been killed on a pushbike back in the thirties. they never gave me credit for passing car test first time as mum took 7 and dad 13, but they didn't start driving until in their 50's.Ive never ridden hard , got it out of my system on mx practice tracks and pre74 scrambles. In these past years, traffic has got heavier and road surface worse (petrol, insurance and road taxes higher).
    my suggestion, not to rush it. take the next step on licence BUT get more training and also go out on rides with competent riders or forum rideouts, you will learn a lot easier.
    this time of the year up to April is best on smaller bikes, both your perception and car drivers too busy with heaters, misting, radios, mobiles, satnavs etc to worry about you.
    Finally, don't think you can out ride the bike, the best in the world do it each season and look at the majority of them, stay within your capabilities and stay safe.
     
     

  6.  
    #6
    Senior Member WR6133's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Tidworth
    Posts
    839
    Bigger bikes only go as fast as you make them go. They generally grip, handle and brake better than tiddlers. So with a measure of common sense while riding, you are probably better off on the SV...... till you get bored and chop it in for the thou.
     
     

  7.  
    #7
    Active Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Calne
    Posts
    51
    Thank you all for the advice and support. I have taken it all on board and believe it would definitely be beneficial for me to seek some further lessons. If i ever join a ride with you all, if you spot something that can help me out, please, i urge you to share thoughts and comments. I think i will most likely go onto the larger bike as i feel it will give me more stability and confidence that i need. Anyone else reading, please also share your thoughts, the more the merrier. Thank you all.
     
     

  8.  
    #8
    Diamond Member Wes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Bristol
    Posts
    2,735
    I couldn't wait to get my 600 when I passed my test. Plenty of power to learn on, and its a big learning curve, great for overtakes as you don't need to use everything to get past, so much better in that respect. As for tyres, and this applies to most, you need to have a look and choose them to suit your needs. Make sure the dates are current if you buy online, and check the compounds. I run a sportier tyre all year long, tho the mileage isn't massive, the trade off is plenty of grip in most conditions, and they warm up nice and quickly too.
     
     

  9.  
    #9
    Administrator BB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    West Wilts
    Posts
    9,102
    Quote Originally Posted by Badgerroy View Post
    When I ride I ride with the mindset that every other road-user is trying to murder my ass
    Totally agree and generally I say much the same to anyone wanting to learn/just starting out on two wheels. They are definitely out to get you - even if they look you in the face they often don't actually see you!
    We could learn a lot from crayons; some are sharp, some are pretty, some are dull, while others bright, some have weird names, but they all have learned to live together in the same box.
     
     

  10. Riding 
    #10
    Active Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Studley
    Posts
    471
    Hi, I am Rospa Turor and it sounds like you could do with a few pointers to help you. Regardless of the size of bike you choose.
    So do contact one of the advance riding groups who will be happy to take you out on a free check ride. Im with Rospa Thames Valley Group tutor but live near Chippenham and would be happy to help.
    Counting down until my next ride out!
     
     

Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •